MSPs pledge to fight MS during MS Awareness Week

This Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Awareness Week (22-28 April), MS Society Scotland were in the Scottish Parliament to raise awareness of the important role research plays in the lives of people affected by MS.

MS affects more than 11,000 people in Scotland and can cause problems with how we walk, move, see, think and feel. But the MS Society is driving research into more – and better – treatments.

The charity currently funds 10 research projects in Scotland with the studies receiving over £3.56 million over their lifetimes.

MSPs from across the country attended a reception at Holyrood to hear from some of the leading names in MS research and people living with the condition.

MSP for Greenock and Inverclyde, Stuart McMillan pledged his support for the crucial research being done in Scotland to stop MS:

“It was great to meet with the MS Society representatives at Holyrood this MS Awareness Week.

“MS is a unique neurological condition because while your immune system normally protects you by fighting off infection, in MS it attacks your nerves by mistake. That is why you can experience MS symptoms in many parts of your body, and it is also why everyone’s MS is different.

“That’s why research into MS treatments and how services can be best organised for people living with MS is crucial as it is unlikely to be a one-treatment-suits-all scenario.”

Morna Simpkins, director of MS Society Scotland said:

“This MS Awareness Week we are highlighting the importance of MS research.

“For more than 11,000 people in Scotland, living with MS is a daily reality. This is why the MS Society is driving cutting-edge research into more – and better treatments to ultimately stop MS.

“By contributing and joining a global group of fundraisers people can help us find new treatments for people living with the often painful and exhausting condition.”

MS is an unpredictable condition that is different for everyone. It affects how a person thinks, feels and moves. For support and information, please contact the helpline on 0808 800 8000.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.